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Race/ethnicity

"I was able to meet people and create relationships that I’ve sustained beyond the workshop, and learned about the different paths and types of impact other leaders are making and ways that I could even potentially join them.”

Sana Shaikh

"Ultimately, I want to couple academia, policy, and advocacy to innovate and implement solutions for people of color from low-income backgrounds."

Dwayne Bensing

“As white people, our actions and beliefs have tangible impact on the movement for educational equity, and we must assess our own behaviors and hold ourselves accountable to ensuring our most vulnerable students receive the education they deserve.”

Steven Almazan

"People most directly impacted by educational inequity need to collectively work together to design and implement policy strategies and campaigns that can elevate the support of our most vulnerable communities."

Arleen Vargas

"The fellowship helped me find a place to channel my frustrations and passions into action."

Andrew Murphy

"My vision for ending educational inequity, then, is to assist people of color and all underrepresented groups in claiming positions of power, for themselves and their communities."

Lisa Lazare

"I can see now the different ways that education intersects with politics, and why it’s critical to have voices advocating for students on all levels."

Lange Luntao

An APIA elected official asked the room full of participants if they had ever envisioned an Asian-American president before, and no one raised their hands despite everyone in the room being APIA themselves.

Tierra Jolly

Tierra Jolly, a sixth-generation Washingtonian, LEE member, and proud teacher, shares her story a

Every day, students who identify as Asian & Pacific Islander American (APIA) face the injustice of educational inequity in classrooms across the nation. APIA voices are too often silenced or disregarded because of the "model minority" myth and the idea that educational equity is a "black-and-white" issue.

Driven by the belief — and backed up by studies — that “highly effective educators are the single ingredient most likely to impact student achievement,” Profound Gentlemen provides career support for black male educators so they can, in turn, serve as mentors to boys of color, ultimately improving the students’ social and emotional well-being and increasing their opportunities for success.

Sara Bokhari

In the education world of today, leadership from people who acknowledge their own intersecting so

Jada Drew

4 tools, tips and practices you’ll learn from listening to this week’s podcast with Jada Drew

Bruce Leal at TFA 25 Summit

LEE Member Bruce Leal conducted policy research and worked to pass policy to ensure quality education for students who speak English as a second language in Hawaii.

Aura Cely

LEE member Aura Cely (TFA San Antonio ’14) is a connector — of people, of resources, of ideas. She believes in the power of organizing to bridge gaps and bring neighbors together, and in making distinct resources to work in tandem and make an even greater impact.