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Organizing

Taylor McGraw and students of The Bell podcast

Taylor McGraw is helping students in New York City make a difference in their communities.

Viri Carrizales at SA RISE action in March, photo credit: Bonnie Arbittier/Rivard Report

“There are DACA students who have reverted back to only leaving the house when they have to. Family plans are back in place. And younger, documented students are having fears of being separated from their families.”

Carly Duffy

"All these experiences empowered me to use my voice and experience in the classroom to be an advocate for the students I work with and their families.”

Brandon Henshaw reached out to LEE’s coaching services when he became frustrated over the systemi

Kiersten Gibson-Cooper

Kiersten Gibson-Cooper teaches more than 100 6th- and 7th-graders every day.

What do the Civil Rights Movement, March for Our Lives, and #FixtheGap in Baltimore schools have

LEE members like Arlene and Tolu are making an impact in their communities beyond the classroom.

Brittney Garza

“I initially thought that the workshop was going to help me learn how to advocate for policy changes I wanted to see at my school. I was really surprised when we were coached through the organizing cycle.”

Steven Almazan

"People most directly impacted by educational inequity need to collectively work together to design and implement policy strategies and campaigns that can elevate the support of our most vulnerable communities."

Hoang Murphy

"As much as I care about and am personally invested in ending educational inequity, I know that I can never care more than the parents and students themselves."

Women in Public Leadership Program 2016

“It is important for me to be a connector, organizer and leader in my community to support all students and families on their journey.”

Tolu Sosanya

"The Community Organizing Fellowship gave me a theoretical and technical framework for understanding organizing, and prepared me for my current role."

Arleen Vargas

"The fellowship helped me find a place to channel my frustrations and passions into action."

Dr. Edward Valandra

Given our colonized status, asserting our educational sovereignty is the antidote for ending educational inequity.

Hoang Murphy

It shouldn’t come down to just one teacher saving a child; we need all adults and systems working together to make sure that every kid gets what they need and deserve.

Brandon Lewis

I fight for educational equity because I believe that black boys born in Alabama deserve a high quality education. They shouldn’t be hindered because they were born in the wrong zip code or because they have black skin.

Jovanda Warren

When I truly reflected on those teachers, I realized that although I was helped, the majority of my classmates were left behind. This realization lit a fire in me to be a teacher like those I had, but to be that for all students.

All too often, policy happens “to” people instead of “with” them, especially in historically marginalized communities.

Sana Shah

My coach always kept my values and goals at the top of her mind — we both wanted me to find a role that was right for me and my leadership.

Kerease Epps

Chicago native Kerease Epps knew growing up that the system she was a part of as a Chicago Public Schools student wasn’t one that gave all students a fair chance.

RST Summit

What do you get when you combine organizers from across the country, a year’s worth of major public action wins and a vision for an equitable future?

LEE members in South Louisiana are working hard to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline in the Bayou State.

You could say Sabine Chishty (TFA New York ’13) has education in her blood.

An intensive six-month program that builds leadership skills through individualized coaching, consulting and exclusive trainings, the Venture Fund & Fellowship is helping LEE members like Yannell take their civic ventures to the next level — and giving them a chance at up to $100,000 in funding.

ONE Houston scored a big win when the school district was persuaded to change its discipline policies. One Day Magazine asks, 'what's next?'

For LEE member Cymone Card, community organizing may be work that’s often overlooked, but she does it because of the powerful impact organizing can have.

Oakland Promise will engage nearly 200,000 children and families to help ensure that all students graduate high school with the expectations, skills, and resources to complete college and be successful in the career of their choice.

Taylor Toynes with For Oak Cliff students

Returning to teach in his home town of Oak Cliff-Dallas, where the incarcerated far outnumber college graduates, Taylor Toynes quickly realized many of the students in South Oak Cliff lacked even the most basic school supplies. Undaunted, Taylor organized a community-wide response to meet the needs of over 1,000 students.

I was born in Los Angeles, but I grew up in rural South Dakota.

NOW Oakland

NOW is a weekend-long skill-building workshop offered regularly throughout the year for LEE members interested in using the power of organizing to change and advance policies, work with decision-makers, and put in place more systems that positively impact students.

Jasma Jones: Community Organizing Fellow

As a Teach for America corps member in my hometown of St.

Our Members

Leadership for Educational Equity (LEE) members are part of a movement of leaders who share an enduring commitment to educational equity and a deep belief in the potential of every child.

To inspire a diverse, enduring movement of leaders to engage civically within their communities to end the injustice of educational inequity

Leadership for Educational Equity (LEE) is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, leadership development organization working to end the injustice of educational inequity by inspiring and supporting a diverse set of leaders with classroom experience to engage civically and politically in their communities.

Kelley Pomis

Kelley Pomis’ career journey is taking her full circle to impact thousands of kids from the east coast to the Rocky Mountain West.

Few would have faulted LEE member Amanda Spoto if she had chosen to spend her Saturday somewhere else.

Carlos Leon

On any school day, Carlos Leon (10’) walks into Richard Green Elementary in the Twin Cities as a teacher-leader.

Mal Mrozek

“What do you believe is important to our kids?”

For LEE members Milagros Barsallo and Veronica Palmer, it all comes down to family.