I’m Just One Person. How Can I Start a Movement? | Leadership for Educational Equity Skip to main content

I’m Just One Person. How Can I Start a Movement?

  • Photo credit:
    rob walsh on Unsplash

Lasting impact happens when groups of people unite around a vision for change; a vision that was once communicated as an idea.

When you’re just one person trying to make a difference, finding supporters and creating momentum around your ideas can seem like a difficult task. But the hard work of changing laws requires a movement-building mindset. Whether you have aspirations to elected leadership or not, these learnings will help you in any arena of civic leadership.

1. Define where you want your movement to take you.

The first step to making a movement is defining where you want to make an impact. Are you passionate about closing the digital divide? How about increasing funding for after-school programs or shaping national education policy? As a LEE member, you have access to resources & supports that will guide you through exploring where you can make the biggest mark as a leader, and from there, how to build your movement.

2. Voice your vision for change.

If you’re the only one who knows about your vision for change, how can you run a successful campaign? Once you begin to voice the challenges and inequities you observe in your community, you might be surprised how many other people can relate.

3. Connect with supporters and allies.

Campaigns turn into movements when they are backed by loyal supporters who shout your message from the rooftops, both in-person and online. Organizing a community toward change starts with understanding who you’re communicating with, and what action you want to take together. 

Now more than ever, it’s critical to spread your vision for change. LEE offers a wide range of resources and support to clarify and spread your message, or in other words, make a movement. 

We can’t wait to see the ripple effect of your movement!


 

 

Take a look at the elements of movement building and learn more with LEE’s Exploring Elected Leadership course.